A Valentine’s Day Love Note

Valentine's Day Is Optional

Valentine’s Day is optional. Either way, you are loved.

It may come as no surprise to those who recall their tween years that at 12, my eldest daughter has been miraculously bestowed full and complete knowledge about self conduct, relationships, and how the world works in general.
 
The importance of a good night’s sleep or breakfast or showering? She’s got it. Why it’s good to express emotion, journal and develop personal values to measure our actions against? Check. How much I love her? Why actions speak louder than words? Why there is an impeachment hearing? Why sugar, screen time and generally all things in moderation? Why you need to say sorry to your sister? Why mom *needs* to go to yoga Monday nights?

She “knoooows.”

According to her, she knows. Everything.

Example #482: At her bedside last night I asked what her class was doing for Valentine’s Day, if anything at all. I received the 19th eye-roll-sigh of the day. “Mom, I’m in middle school. Don’t you know that Valentine’s Day goes into hibernation in middle school?”

“Oh, right,” I said. “You mean, like, due to the awkwardness and stuff?”

Eye roll #20 plus groan for emphasis. “Yes. Good night.” Beat. “I love you.”

For today, that is enough. It’s all I really need to know.

So. If your Valentine’s Day is in hibernation – due to puberty or any other potentially less awkward reason – you are not alone. And if you’re feeling more sigh-growl-eye-roll than double-heart-eyes-emoji this week, that’s ok, too. You are loved ❤️

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Chantel Garrett

Chantel Garrett is Strong 365’s founder. As supporter and advocate for her brother who lives with schizophrenia, she is passionate about improving equitable access to quality mental healthcare and social support, and driving radical change in the way we view and care for our own emotional health.

She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her husband, two daughters, one dog, a cat and five chickens, and can be found @Chantel and on LinkedIn.

At Strong 365, we believe that the strength to persist and thrive through a mental health challenge exists in all of us. Join our community on InstagramFacebook, and Twitter and keep the conversation going about how to live well with psychosis.

If you’re interested in sharing your story of strength, you can submit yours here (anonymous or attributed to you), or email info@strong365.org.

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